différence & répétition

AND — AND — AND —

“he had American hips, ready for a neat belt and the faraway ghost of a gunbelt.”

– A.S. Byatt, Possession


'The heavens as they were on April 25, 1384' by the Persian polymath Mahmud ibn Yahya ibn al-Hasan al-Kashi (completed between 1410 - 11)

'The heavens as they were on April 25, 1384' by the Persian polymath Mahmud ibn Yahya ibn al-Hasan al-Kashi (completed between 1410 - 11)

“… and something began to hurt violently within him, and he didn’t know what it was: if it was really being alone that hurt so much, the pain coming upon him suddenly; or that he had wandered into this happenstance so dispossessed, while everyone outside was wandering around so happily; or if it was that immeasurable distance that hurt so much, making him realize how unbearably far away were these Saints, these Kings, these Beatified Ones, Marys and Christs — and that illumination.”

– László Krasznahorkai, Seiobo There Below, trans. Ottilie Mulzet

“Heart weeps.
Head tries to help heart.
Head tells heart how it is, again:
You will lose the ones you love. They will all go. But even the earth will go, someday.
Heart feels better, then.
But the words of head do not remain long in the ears of heart.
Heart is so new to this.
I want them back, says heart.
Head is all heart has.
Help, head. Help heart.”

– Lydia Davis, “Head, Heart”

“You have been a negative nothing, now you want to be a positive nothing. I have begun trying, in these first days of the new year, but so far it’s pretty difficult. I’m pretty close to nothing all morning, but by late afternoon what is in me that is something starts throwing its weight around.”

– Lydia Davis, “New Year’s Resolution”

“In every part of every living thing
is stuff that once was rock
In blood the minerals of the rock,”

– Lorine Niedecker +

Albrecht Dürer, Young Hare (1502) /

Jon Carling, rabbit scribble (2014)

Roberto Bolaño, “The Snow-Novel,” trans. Laura Healy

Roberto Bolaño, “The Snow-Novel,” trans. Laura Healy

“You take delight not in a city’s seven or seventy wonders, but in the answer it gives to a question of yours.”

– Italo Calvino, Invisible Cities, trans. William Weaver

“Arriving at each new city, the traveler finds again a past of his that he did not know he had: the foreignness of what you no longer are or no longer possess lies in wait for you in foreign, unpossessed places.”

– Italo Calvino, Invisible Cities, trans. William Weaver